The Importance Of Being Visible

The Importance of Being Visible

I want to extend the deepest thanks to every trans/gender non-conforming person who has shared their personal stories through my blog. Each of you are a string in the larger fabric that is the LGBT community. Your stories are more important than any of us realize, the difficulties you have experienced are the similar to others and could be the difference they need in feeling their own worth. To each of you who reads this, remember that you are part of that fabric as well. I hope that the stories and information I share can be of some use to you. I hope that you realize you are not alone in this world, there are others like you and have went through very similar things. We have survived through sheer force of will and determination. Lean on us for the strength you may need, there are those of us who give it willingly.

With all the huff and hype the media and political figures put out, they want you to think that transgender people are a new concept. That their interests only became more relevant after marriage equality started. We all know that trans people have been part of human history since the beginning, just like lesbians, gays, and bisexuals. The battle for transgender rights has been a long, hard struggle and activist Samy Nour shows just how long this battle has been going on. “Imagine how the conversation would shift if we acknowledge just how long trans people have been demanding equality,” he says.

Having these talks with people is never a comfortable situation, and it shouldn’t be. When things become comfortable, we tend to overlook what causes issues and try to gloss over them. Being an advocate for a community will always be that struggle to make others understand what is outside of their normal views and lives. It is how we prove that each of us has worth and is just as meaningful as the next person. LB Hannahs is a genderqueer parent and shows how they manage and negotiate the discomforts of everyday life.

The more our stories get in front of people, the more it forces them to realize that they already know someone like you or me. This puts a face with a label and forces them to look at us in a differently. It is harder to hate groups of people when there is emotional attachment to them.  And educating them on how long the struggle for acceptance and equality has been going on will hopefully change their minds. It is left to us to be the stewards for the next generations of LGBT people. How we choose to fight today will affect how they live tomorrow. The struggle still starts with the education of our community. If we don’t understand the struggle, there is no hope of being able to unite and fight.

Again, thank each of you for trusting me with the stories you have shared. It has been my honor and privilege to share them with our community. My hope is to keep doing this for as long as anyone has a story they want to share. It is a means for you to be visible, even if you choose not to disclose your name. Your story is the important part of visibility, that is what can and will affect another someone else.

Ted Talk Tuesday

Greetings loyal readers, I apologize for not posting yesterday. With it being Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day I felt it best to spend the day in contemplation about some of the words of Dr King. Also, to use his inspiration in looking at future posts. So for your enjoyment I am adding a couple more Ted Talk links for today’s post.

First up is LZ Granderson who sheds light on the Super Duper Gay Lifestyle and Gay Agenda. He shares, in no nonsense terms, what it means to be LGBTQ and misconceptions that the general populace may have. He discusses states where it was still legal to vacate you from your housing, fired you from  your job, and etc, for the simple thing of being LGBTQ. So, all you heterosexuals reading this, run for your lives. And for the LGBTQ click below to watch the Ted Talk, oh you heterosexuals can as well. Its a equal opportunity place around here.

 

The last Ted Talk today is from IO Tillet-Wright and Fifty Shades of Being Gay and how it applied to the life that IO lived. IO uses photography as a means to engage people in topics that are outside of their comfort zones. Topics that challenge your thoughts on sexuality, gender, and what it meant to be in this world as your true authentic self. Topics such as Prop 8 and how lines are blurred in identities. What it is like to live your life outside of any prescribed box versus what modern convention states that a person should be.

 

The underlying theme here is that our very own Declaration of Independence sheds invaluable light on what it means to be a person in this world. To live as who we are and how we interact with this wonderous world. Our forefathers gave us that inalienable ability when they came here, somewhere since that time we have lost our way. These people, not defined as an activist, show us the err of our ways. They state in simplicity on how it is to be ourselves and let others be who they are. We should celebrate our differences, not show hatred towards. I hope these two Ted Talks can shape some view you may have had and allow you to open up and realize that the limitations we place aren’t the ending of what it means to be human.